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Badges

Classes are rewarded with badges for writing blog posts described in the lesson plans. Additionally, badges are awarded for classes that write different combinations of posts. Be sure to strategize with your class how to maximize your points.

DescriptionPoints

individual badges

amicus
Amicus Brief Badge
The goal of an amicus brief is to provide information to the court about the implications of their decision beyond the affect it will have on the two parties who appear before them.150
civil-rights
Civil Rights Badge
Learn about how our Constitution protects and promotes civil rights.50
constitutionallaw
Constitutional Law Badge
Write about constitutional law issues.50
criminal-justice
Criminal Justice Badge
In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups: the police who investigate crime and the district attorneys who prosecute the offenders.50
education
Education Badge
Consider how our system of laws protects how students receive an education.50
employees-rights
Employees’ Rights Badge
Consider how the rights of employers balance with the rights of employees.50
freedom-religion
Freedom of Religion Badge
Learn about how the Constitution protects religious freedom.50
legislative-process
Legislative Process Badge
Consider how a bill becomes a law, and how this impacts whether the law is constitutional.50
podcast
Podcast Badge
Express yourself in a podcast talking about the Constitution. 150
separation-of-powers
Separation of Powers Badge
Our system of government is divided into three branches--the legislative, the executive, and the judicial. However, the separation of these powers is not always so clear.50
justice
The Justice Badge
Learn about how our Constitution and system of laws provides for equal justice under the law.50

premier badges

BRI
Bill of Rights Institute Badge
Consider if the Fourth Amendment places any limitations on a school’s power to search students.300
consource
Consource Badge
Consider if the First Amendment places any limitations on a school’s power to punish students for things the students say on the Internet outside of school.300